St Kilda Triangle named design site for international sustainable energy infrastructure ideas competition

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Regatta H2O by Christopher Sjoberg and Ryo Saito, winner of LAGI 2016 Santa Monica. Energy technology: aerostatic flutter wind harvesting (WindBelt™). Water technology: fog harvesting. Annual capacity: 70 MWh (used on site) and 112 million liters of drinking water.

Regatta H2O by Christopher Sjoberg and Ryo Saito, winner of LAGI 2016 Santa Monica. Energy technology: aerostatic flutter wind harvesting (WindBelt™). Water technology: fog harvesting. Annual capacity: 70 MWh (used on site) and 112 million liters of drinking water. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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Beyond the Wave by Heerim Architects and Planners, a submission to LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: organic thin film. Annual capacity: 4,229 MWh.

Beyond the Wave by Heerim Architects and Planners, a submission to LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: organic thin film. Annual capacity: 4,229 MWh. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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Solar Hourglass by Santiago Muros Cortés, winner of LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: concentrated solar power (thermal beam-down tower with heliostats). Annual capacity: 7,500 MWh.

Solar Hourglass by Santiago Muros Cortés, winner of LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: concentrated solar power (thermal beam-down tower with heliostats). Annual capacity: 7,500 MWh. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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Scene-Sensor by James Murray and Shota Vashakmadze, winner of LAGI 2012 NYC. Energy technologies: piezoelectric generators (thin film and embedded wire). Annual capacity: 5,500 MWh.

Scene-Sensor by James Murray and Shota Vashakmadze, winner of LAGI 2012 NYC. Energy technologies: piezoelectric generators (thin film and embedded wire). Annual capacity: 5,500 MWh. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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A bird's-eye view of the triangular site in the beachside suburb of St Kilda, from 2015.

A bird’s-eye view of the triangular site in the beachside suburb of St Kilda, from 2015. Image: Port Phillip City Council

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Melbourne’s St Kilda Triangle, the beachside block home to the historic Palais Theatre, has been named as the design site for international sustainable energy infrastructure design competition organized by the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI).

A bird’s-eye view of the triangular site in the beachside suburb of St Kilda, from 2015. Image:  Port Phillip City Council

The competition will seek the best designs for large-scale, site-specific public art installations that are capable of generating clean energy on the site, which is currently undergoing development, to an ARM Architecture masterplan.

Architects, landscape architects, artists, designers, scientists, engineers and others will be invited to submit design proposals from 5 January 2018.

With the slogan “renewable energy can be beautiful,” LAGI is an initiative that aims to “accelerate the transition to post-carbon economies by providing models of renewable energy infrastructure that add value to public space, inspire and educate.”

Run every two years, the competition has previously been held at sites in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, New York City, and Santa Monica. Melbourne was named as 2018’s host city in July.

Solar Hourglass by Santiago Muros Cortés, winner of LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: concentrated solar power (thermal beam-down tower with heliostats). Annual capacity: 7,500 MWh.  Image:  Courtesy LAGI

The regional director of the 2018 event will be Jodi Newbombe of Carbon Arts, a Melbourne-based organization that aims to harness creativity to encourage a sustainable future. Carbon Arts’ previous projects include Amphibious Architecture - what does the Derwent want?, a sculptural project that used coloured lights to indicate estuarine health, and Curating Cities, a five-year collaborative research project examining how the arts can generate environmentally beneficial behavioural change.

The competition is being run in partnership with the Victorian government’s Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning and will ofer a first prize of US$16,000 (A$20,820).

The first prize winner of the 2016 competition in Santa Monica was “Regatta H:20: Familiar Form, Chameleon Infrastructure,” a design that used traditional-looking yacht sails to transform wind power into electricity.

The design brief will be made available on 5 January 2018. The competition closes in May and prizes will be awarded in October. The primary exhibition and award ceremony for LAGI 2018 will take place at Federation Square.

For more information, head here


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