International design competition to reimagine renewable energy infrastructure in Melbourne

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Beyond the Wave by Heerim Architects and Planners, a submission to LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: organic thin film. Annual capacity: 4,229 MWh.

Beyond the Wave by Heerim Architects and Planners, a submission to LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: organic thin film. Annual capacity: 4,229 MWh. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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Regatta H2O by Christopher Sjoberg and Ryo Saito, winner of LAGI 2016 Santa Monica. Energy technology: aerostatic flutter wind harvesting (WindBelt™). Water technology: fog harvesting. Annual capacity: 70 MWh (used on site) and 112 million liters of drinking water.

Regatta H2O by Christopher Sjoberg and Ryo Saito, winner of LAGI 2016 Santa Monica. Energy technology: aerostatic flutter wind harvesting (WindBelt™). Water technology: fog harvesting. Annual capacity: 70 MWh (used on site) and 112 million liters of drinking water. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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Solar Hourglass by Santiago Muros Cortés, winner of LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: concentrated solar power (thermal beam-down tower with heliostats). Annual capacity: 7,500 MWh.

Solar Hourglass by Santiago Muros Cortés, winner of LAGI 2014 Copenhagen. Energy technologies: concentrated solar power (thermal beam-down tower with heliostats). Annual capacity: 7,500 MWh. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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Scene-Sensor by James Murray and Shota Vashakmadze, winner of LAGI 2012 NYC. Energy technologies: piezoelectric generators (thin film and embedded wire). Annual capacity: 5,500 MWh.

Scene-Sensor by James Murray and Shota Vashakmadze, winner of LAGI 2012 NYC. Energy technologies: piezoelectric generators (thin film and embedded wire). Annual capacity: 5,500 MWh. Image: Courtesy LAGI

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One of the world’s most followed sustainable design events, the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), has announced that its next international design competition will be sited in Melbourne.

Run in partnership with the Victorian government’s Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, the competition will be open to artists, designers, architects, landscape architects, scientists, engineers and others to submit proposals for large-scale, site-specific public art installations that are capable of generating clean energy for a site in Melbourne.

The competition forms part of the Victorian government’s $146 million Renewable Energy Action Plan, which was launched by former United States Vice President Al Gore on 13 July 2017. The plan outlines twenty-three actions to advance Victoria’s renewable energy sector – the LAGI competition is included in Action Thirteen,Supporting important artistic and cultural sustainability events.”

According to the LAGI, design proposals should transform public spaces into productive landscapes for green energy and “inspire the public to be a part of the [clean energy] solution and help Melbourne grow sustainably.”

Founded in Pittsburgh by artist Elizabeth Monoian and her architect husband Robert Ferry, the LAGI’s goal is to accelerate the transition to post-carbon economies by providing “models of renewable energy infrastructure that add value to public space, inspire, and educate,” as well as providing equitable power to thousands of homes around the world.

The LAGI’s slogan is “renewable energy can be beautiful.”

The initiative has staged four competitions since 2010, with sites in the United Arab Emirates, Freshkills Park in New York, Copenhagen and Southern California.

The Melbourne design brief is currently being drafted with local partners to align with the strategic plans and cultural context of the site, the city, and the region.

The competition will be launched in January 2018 with submissions due in May 2018.

For more info visit the LAGI website.


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